Though I don’t recommend blindly copying what other authors are doing to market their books, because there is no one-size-fits-all, magic-bullet book marketing solution, and what works for one author or book, might not work for you or yours, I do recommend keeping updated on what other authors are doing and borrowing those ideas that make sense.

Mentors are important in almost everything we do, but most of us can’t afford to hire one, and those that we really admire are likely beyond our reach. (Could you imagine the answer if you contacted Stephen King and asked him to be your mentor?) Luckily, though, with today’s technology, you can be mentored (at least to a degree) by anyone you want. And you don’t need their permission, and they don’t even have to know they’re mentoring you.

Gabriela Pereira discusses this notion of a “virtual mentor” in her book, diyMFA. To apply it to finding a marketing mentor, simply find an author you admire, study their websites, subscribe to their newsletters, and follow them on all of their social media outlets. Try to choose mentors who have books similar to or at least in the same genre as yours. Choose someone who you view as being “successful” in marketing their books.

Don’t copy everything your chosen mentors do; simply watch what they do and harvest ideas that make sense for you and your book. Try some out and evaluate what you try so you can stop doing anything that doesn’t work for you.

Inspired by Gabriela, I have chosen two mentors who I view as more than marketing mentors for me, but more as lifestyle mentors. They are Joanna Penn and C. Hope Clark. Both of these authors have several successful fiction books and they are running successful businesses which also help authors. Joanna’s thrillers are published under J.F. Penn and her website, thecreativepenn.com, helps authors with all aspects of writing, including marketing. She has several courses, books, and other content for free download and sale. Hope has written several successful mysteries and she runs fundsforwriters.com, which helps authors earn an income from, in addition to marketing books, freelancing, crowdfunding, grants, and other income-generating activities involving writing.

Of course, I don’t want to be exactly like either of these women; I have to offer something unique. My model is writing historical fiction books and helping authors with book marketing, including the writing craft and editing insofar as this relates to the product part of book marketing. Watching what they do is helping to inspire me and is giving me ideas to tweak and use to promote myself and my own books.